Human translation: Human translation is performed by people who are fluent in the language pair being translated. The whole process, from translation to proofreading, is performed by people. This type of translation is generally more accurate than machine translation since the humans who translate will account for nuances and cultural context. Because of this, though, it takes longer than machine translation.
Amara Enterprise delivers powerful solutions for your video accessibility and localization needs. Key platform features include private and secure workspaces, flexible workflows for creating quality subtitles, plus a powerful API for connecting seamlessly to your own platform. Amara helps companies around the world streamline their subtitling processes.
Human machine translation with translation memory and glossaries options. The program features a graphical user interface that can be located anywhere on the screen side by side with the text being translated. Both the translation memories and the glossaries are bi-directional (For example: they can be used in English-French and French-English translation). Both are text files that can be easily edited using any word processing tool (Notepad, MS Excel, MS Word, etc. ) Features also including importing SDL TRADOS translation memories (TMX and Workbench-exported translation memories) and WordFast TM's. Extra features include aligning previous translations, etc. - ammokhtar https://www.fastcompany.com/1807477/web-video-gets-real-time-translation-50-languages
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders. https://www.pactranz.com/business-translation-services/audio-translator-video-and-audio-files/

If you think that you don’t need a translator for learning a language, you are wrong. There is no better way to learn a foreign language than to have a device repeat back to you in native tongue the exact definition of a phrase or sentence. The device is equipped with many applications, which facilitate learning. These applications talk back to you, challenge your skills, test your grammar and even check your knowledge of vocabulary. Forget about carrying useless and heavy books around with you. Next time take your electronic translator and make learning fun and enjoyable.


It's important to keep in mind there’s no such thing as “real time translation” yet, despite what Google says. We’re still not quite there for the Star Trek-style Universal Translator that just speaks in your language while someone else is speaking. Right now it’s sentence (pause) by sentence (pause), give or take a few sentences. No translator is meant to tell your life story. Mostly it’s for asking for the bathroom. The ili does that, and a lot more. It's positioned as travel-centric, but I threw a lot of random phrases its way and it did pretty well. Maybe it can't translate random medical conditions, but just about anything a traveler would need should be covered.
The palm-sized ECTACO Partner 900 is ideal for those interested in learning Spanish. It instantly converts voice text by repeating it aloud or speaking it in Spanish or English, and also has a roster of other features to help you learn the language. Take a photo of text (such as a restaurant menu) and it instantly converts it to English (an Internet connection is required for this part of the program). There’s also a talking picture dictionary and phrasebook, as well as a full language-learning program with linguistic crosswords and pronunciation assistance. The translator measures 6 x 3.5 x 0.7 inches and weighs 9.8 ounces.
Offering both enterprise and consumer versions, Microsoft Translator is probably the most versatile option on the market. Users can type the text they want translated, speak aloud, or take a photo of an image containing the text. The translator is also available as a Smartwatch app, for both iOS and Android, making it easily accessible for on-the-go travelers. https://ca.indeed.com/cmp/Rev.com/reviews
But I understand that not everyone is willing to wing it like that. Some topics aren’t as easily explained with hand gestures (how do you mime something like “hotel” or "I'm allergic to peanuts."). While I’m a strong proponent of getting a local SIM when you travel, and thereby gaining access to Google Translate wherever you are, that too is not always possible.

Join the tens of thousands of people making the wealth of information on the internet accessible to everyone. There are many opportunities to volunteer. Organizations, like TED Talks, Scientific American, Net in Nederlands, and Udacity are just a few. Others, such as the Captions Requested team ensure videos are accessible to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. https://mashable.com/video/wt2-plus-wearable-translator-timekettle/


I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders. https://www.jrlanguage.com/translation-services/video-translations/
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