There are three buttons. The power button does what you’d expect. You hold the big one on the front to have ili listen and automatically translate. Tapping it again will repeat the phrase it just spoke. The third button repeats back what it thinks you said, in ili’s voice. If you hold down that last button it switches between the ili's 3 languages: Spanish, Japanese, and Mandarin.
Cloudwords is free for a customer to use for up to three languages in 5 concurrent projects at time. Included with Cloudwords free edition, there is a choice of integrations with Marketing Automation (Marketo, Eloqua, SFMC, etc), Content Management (Wordpress, Drupal, etc) or product content (Github, Subversion, etc) that automatically interface with existing tools.

Electronic translators have replaced bulky and large dictionary books. The new age of translators are small and very compact, making them the perfect accessory to take with you when travelling. You no longer have to worry about finding room for a large dictionary or phrasebook. When buying an electronic translator it is important to note the language spoken in the country you plan to visit. Make sure that the translator you plan to purchase is equipped with the language of your destination. Electronic translators today come with many functions. Determining which functions you need is very important. Is speech translation needed in your translator? This is a very important question to ask your self when coming to a conclusion as to which translator to purchase. Speech recognition allows you to speak into the device and receive a translated text and voice phrase back in the desired language. Make sure your translator is equipped with the vocabulary that you need. If you are a doctor then you will need to make sure the translator is equipped with a wide range of medical phrases and grammatical sentences. It is important to note the quality of your translated text. The most accurate translators use an online connection to access their database of words. If you are learning a new language an electronic translator would be a great learning tool. Today electronic translators are equipped with many tools and applications to facilitate the learning process of a foreign language. If you think you don’t need an electronic translator you could be wrong.
One Hour Translation is a translation service provider specializing in delivering accurate translations for businesses in the legal, technical, Internet and marketing industries. Their experienced translators can translate one 200-word document in an hour, and a countdown clock that begins once the translator has started working on the document signals how long it will take for the project to be finalized.
IflyTek has been developing its Auto Speech Recognition technology that allows a device to convert speech instantly, and the Salange Electronic Translator is pocket-sized and allows users to translate Chinese to English and English to Chinese. The device is designed to block out background noise, so users can speak clearly into the microphone. After recording, the phrase is translated into the opposite language and “spoken” by the device. Salange is perfect for those who need practice with the “audio” part of a language (it doesn’t translate written word) or for communicating when traveling. The translator measures 3.2 x 1.6 x 1 inches and has a micro SD charging cord. 
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders. https://www.inwhatlanguage.com/video-translation-its-easier-than-you-think/

Electronic translators have replaced bulky and large dictionary books. The new age of translators are small and very compact, making them the perfect accessory to take with you when travelling. You no longer have to worry about finding room for a large dictionary or phrasebook. When buying an electronic translator it is important to note the language spoken in the country you plan to visit. Make sure that the translator you plan to purchase is equipped with the language of your destination. Electronic translators today come with many functions. Determining which functions you need is very important. Is speech translation needed in your translator? This is a very important question to ask your self when coming to a conclusion as to which translator to purchase. Speech recognition allows you to speak into the device and receive a translated text and voice phrase back in the desired language. Make sure your translator is equipped with the vocabulary that you need. If you are a doctor then you will need to make sure the translator is equipped with a wide range of medical phrases and grammatical sentences. It is important to note the quality of your translated text. The most accurate translators use an online connection to access their database of words. If you are learning a new language an electronic translator would be a great learning tool. Today electronic translators are equipped with many tools and applications to facilitate the learning process of a foreign language. If you think you don’t need an electronic translator you could be wrong.
The next question you want to ask yourself is whether you need an electronic translator that recognizes speech. Thanks to the growing development in technology it is now possible to speak directly into your electronic translator and receive an automated translation in the other language of choice. Sounds incredible? Well, it is. Say “good afternoon” and you’ll hear "konnichiwa" back in Japanese. It’s important to note that speech recognition is quite a new technology and it still requires an Internet connection for accurate translations.
Human translation: Human translation is performed by people who are fluent in the language pair being translated. The whole process, from translation to proofreading, is performed by people. This type of translation is generally more accurate than machine translation since the humans who translate will account for nuances and cultural context. Because of this, though, it takes longer than machine translation. https://www.daytranslations.com/
Three-step validation system: Every translation project done by Language Scientific undergoes a three-step validation system for quality assurance. Three sets of eyes look at every project: the translator, editor and proofreader. This ensures a more accurate translation, and any discrepancies between the three sets of eyes will be brought to the attention of the project manager, who will refer to the client for the final decision.
Simple process: It’s simple to get your text translated by Translate by Humans on their website. Start by selecting the language pairs you need to be translated. Next, enter the text that needs to be translated. Finally, specify which category the translated document falls into. Choose from general, medical, legal and others. Click the “translate now” to pay. Your translation will be sent to you as soon as possible.
Gregg Parker is a writer and puppy enthusiast who divides his time between Los Angeles and the rest of the world. A graduate of the University of Southern California, his eclectic career has involved positions in education, health care, entertainment, nonprofit fundraising, technology, and literature. A points and miles expert, he's well-versed in all topics related to travel, including luggage and travel accessories. Other areas of expertise include pet care products, teaching resources, kitchen appliances, and anything related to coffee or barbecue.
It's important to keep in mind there’s no such thing as “real time translation” yet, despite what Google says. We’re still not quite there for the Star Trek-style Universal Translator that just speaks in your language while someone else is speaking. Right now it’s sentence (pause) by sentence (pause), give or take a few sentences. No translator is meant to tell your life story. Mostly it’s for asking for the bathroom. The ili does that, and a lot more. It's positioned as travel-centric, but I threw a lot of random phrases its way and it did pretty well. Maybe it can't translate random medical conditions, but just about anything a traveler would need should be covered.
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders.
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders.
The Wikipedia translator -- very useful for technical translations. Harnesses the vast amount of cross-lingual information on Wikipedia and Wiktionary, and present it in a neat, time-saving way. Simple user interface. Built for translators, by a translator, but is a generic tool for anyone who wonders what a word or phrase means, which language it is and what it is in other languages. All Wikipedia languages (currently 292).
Three-step validation system: Every translation project done by Language Scientific undergoes a three-step validation system for quality assurance. Three sets of eyes look at every project: the translator, editor and proofreader. This ensures a more accurate translation, and any discrepancies between the three sets of eyes will be brought to the attention of the project manager, who will refer to the client for the final decision.
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