The Wikipedia translator -- very useful for technical translations. Harnesses the vast amount of cross-lingual information on Wikipedia and Wiktionary, and present it in a neat, time-saving way. Simple user interface. Built for translators, by a translator, but is a generic tool for anyone who wonders what a word or phrase means, which language it is and what it is in other languages. All Wikipedia languages (currently 292).


Offering both enterprise and consumer versions, Microsoft Translator is probably the most versatile option on the market. Users can type the text they want translated, speak aloud, or take a photo of an image containing the text. The translator is also available as a Smartwatch app, for both iOS and Android, making it easily accessible for on-the-go travelers. https://techcrunch.com/2015/01/14/amaaaaaazing/
The next question you want to ask yourself is whether you need an electronic translator that recognizes speech. Thanks to the growing development in technology it is now possible to speak directly into your electronic translator and receive an automated translation in the other language of choice. Sounds incredible? Well, it is. Say “good afternoon” and you’ll hear "konnichiwa" back in Japanese. It’s important to note that speech recognition is quite a new technology and it still requires an Internet connection for accurate translations. https://www.amazon.com/ili-Instant-Offline-Language-Translator/product-reviews/B078J28C1L
It was actually making the video that brought me around on the ili. How well it worked, understanding what I said and quickly translating it, all without the help of the Internet, that was pretty neat. Right now, I can see this coming in handy for a lot of people. In the near future, though, I’m positive Trek’s Universal Translator, or the Babel fish, or C-3P0, will all definitely be possible soon. https://www.g2.com/categories/video-translation
But I understand that not everyone is willing to wing it like that. Some topics aren’t as easily explained with hand gestures (how do you mime something like “hotel” or "I'm allergic to peanuts."). While I’m a strong proponent of getting a local SIM when you travel, and thereby gaining access to Google Translate wherever you are, that too is not always possible.

Language Scientific was founded in 1999 by a group of international scientists and engineers. The company was born out of the group’s frustration with the inaccurate technical and scientific translations they discovered while working together on a nuclear non-proliferation project for the US Department of Energy. Today, Language Scientific has grown to include over 5,000 highly specialized translators.


For a translator that will get you through the basics of several European languages without putting a giant hole in your pocket, the Franklin TWE-118 is a great choice. The handheld device translates to and from English, French, Spanish, German and Italian with more than 210,000 translations available. The device measures 4.25 x 2.75 x .62 and resembles a calculator, with a letter keyboard to type in words and phrases. There’s a search function that categorizes phrases into useful groups such as dining, hotels, directions, business and more. There’s also a built-in currency converter, spell checker, databank for names and phone numbers and calculator, plus a world clock and games.  https://www.3playmedia.com/solutions/services/translation-subtitling/
These devices are a popular gift for elderly relatives or retirees doing a bit of traveling, and the last thing they need is to spend all day messing around with a faulty Bluetooth connection, which is why the top picks on this list all have big screens. You won't need to pair them with your phone, and they support a wide variety of languages. More niche options have features like offline translation, but the language selection is limited.
Human translation: Human translation is performed by people who are fluent in the language pair being translated. The whole process, from translation to proofreading, is performed by people. This type of translation is generally more accurate than machine translation since the humans who translate will account for nuances and cultural context. Because of this, though, it takes longer than machine translation.

Electronic translators have replaced bulky and large dictionary books. The new age of translators are small and very compact, making them the perfect accessory to take with you when travelling. You no longer have to worry about finding room for a large dictionary or phrasebook. When buying an electronic translator it is important to note the language spoken in the country you plan to visit. Make sure that the translator you plan to purchase is equipped with the language of your destination. Electronic translators today come with many functions. Determining which functions you need is very important. Is speech translation needed in your translator? This is a very important question to ask your self when coming to a conclusion as to which translator to purchase. Speech recognition allows you to speak into the device and receive a translated text and voice phrase back in the desired language. Make sure your translator is equipped with the vocabulary that you need. If you are a doctor then you will need to make sure the translator is equipped with a wide range of medical phrases and grammatical sentences. It is important to note the quality of your translated text. The most accurate translators use an online connection to access their database of words. If you are learning a new language an electronic translator would be a great learning tool. Today electronic translators are equipped with many tools and applications to facilitate the learning process of a foreign language. If you think you don’t need an electronic translator you could be wrong.
The Wikipedia translator -- very useful for technical translations. Harnesses the vast amount of cross-lingual information on Wikipedia and Wiktionary, and present it in a neat, time-saving way. Simple user interface. Built for translators, by a translator, but is a generic tool for anyone who wonders what a word or phrase means, which language it is and what it is in other languages. All Wikipedia languages (currently 292). https://translate.video/app/
Electronic translators have replaced bulky and large dictionary books. The new age of translators are small and very compact, making them the perfect accessory to take with you when travelling. You no longer have to worry about finding room for a large dictionary or phrasebook. When buying an electronic translator it is important to note the language spoken in the country you plan to visit. Make sure that the translator you plan to purchase is equipped with the language of your destination. Electronic translators today come with many functions. Determining which functions you need is very important. Is speech translation needed in your translator? This is a very important question to ask your self when coming to a conclusion as to which translator to purchase. Speech recognition allows you to speak into the device and receive a translated text and voice phrase back in the desired language. Make sure your translator is equipped with the vocabulary that you need. If you are a doctor then you will need to make sure the translator is equipped with a wide range of medical phrases and grammatical sentences. It is important to note the quality of your translated text. The most accurate translators use an online connection to access their database of words. If you are learning a new language an electronic translator would be a great learning tool. Today electronic translators are equipped with many tools and applications to facilitate the learning process of a foreign language. If you think you don’t need an electronic translator you could be wrong.

TransBox: One Hour Translation developed TransBox to help businesses who frequently communicate with foreign language speakers over email. This unique system helps bridge the language gap between the email sender and reader. A client can email you in one language, and you will respond in your native language after having the original email translated by a human translator. The whole process takes only a few hours for a short email exchange. https://eu.textmaster.com/subtitly-multilingual-video-subtitling/
The next question you want to ask yourself is whether you need an electronic translator that recognizes speech. Thanks to the growing development in technology it is now possible to speak directly into your electronic translator and receive an automated translation in the other language of choice. Sounds incredible? Well, it is. Say “good afternoon” and you’ll hear "konnichiwa" back in Japanese. It’s important to note that speech recognition is quite a new technology and it still requires an Internet connection for accurate translations. https://www.amazon.com/ili-Instant-Offline-Language-Translator/product-reviews/B078J28C1L
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