As a translator that can recognize and convert spoken language, the Pulomi TT is a useful tool for any international traveler. This super-compact device slips into your pocket or purse so you can translate anywhere, anytime. Download the TT app, connect your phone to the device via Bluetooth and instantly translate between 52 different languages, including Japanese, German, Arabic, Hindi, and many more (it does require an Internet connection to work). The TT uses a high-fidelity microphone to record the foreign language and then speaks the translation back, in addition to sending a text transcription to your phone. This makes it a very helpful device for travelers, and particularly useful to those who are trying to learn another language. 

These devices are a popular gift for elderly relatives or retirees doing a bit of traveling, and the last thing they need is to spend all day messing around with a faulty Bluetooth connection, which is why the top picks on this list all have big screens. You won't need to pair them with your phone, and they support a wide variety of languages. More niche options have features like offline translation, but the language selection is limited.


Join the tens of thousands of people making the wealth of information on the internet accessible to everyone. There are many opportunities to volunteer. Organizations, like TED Talks, Scientific American, Net in Nederlands, and Udacity are just a few. Others, such as the Captions Requested team ensure videos are accessible to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.
But I understand that not everyone is willing to wing it like that. Some topics aren’t as easily explained with hand gestures (how do you mime something like “hotel” or "I'm allergic to peanuts."). While I’m a strong proponent of getting a local SIM when you travel, and thereby gaining access to Google Translate wherever you are, that too is not always possible.

John Lincoln is CEO of Ignite Visibility, one of the top digital marketing agencies in the nation and a 2017 and 2018 Inc. 5000 company. As a digital marketing expert and in-demand public speaker, Lincoln is consistently named one of the top marketing experts in the industry. In 2017, he was the recipient of the Search Engine Land "Search Marketer of the Year" award, he has been named the #1 SEO consultant by Clutch.co and most admired CEO by the San Diego Business Journal. Ignite Visibility crafts custom digital marketing strategies for clients, including services in SEO, social media, paid media, email marketing, Amazon and more.
Another factor to take into consideration is the translator’s range of vocabulary. Make sure your translator is equipped with professional vocabulary for whatever purpose you intend to use it for. You don’t want to translate to your doctor in China the wrong text as to what symptoms you are feeling. That is why it is important to make sure your translator will have a well-developed medical vocabulary. The number of words your translator is equipped with will guarantee a quality and accuracy of translation.
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders.
Language Scientific was founded in 1999 by a group of international scientists and engineers. The company was born out of the group’s frustration with the inaccurate technical and scientific translations they discovered while working together on a nuclear non-proliferation project for the US Department of Energy. Today, Language Scientific has grown to include over 5,000 highly specialized translators.

The next question you want to ask yourself is whether you need an electronic translator that recognizes speech. Thanks to the growing development in technology it is now possible to speak directly into your electronic translator and receive an automated translation in the other language of choice. Sounds incredible? Well, it is. Say “good afternoon” and you’ll hear "konnichiwa" back in Japanese. It’s important to note that speech recognition is quite a new technology and it still requires an Internet connection for accurate translations. https://www.amazon.com/ili-Instant-Offline-Language-Translator/product-reviews/B078J28C1L


ISO-9001:2008 certification: The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) certifies certain quality management procedures, and ISO-9001:2008 is the most updated version of this certification. It is not specific to translation or localization industries; however, it certifies that there are documented processes to the translation or localization service. It is an objective standard that ensures certain quality measures are being met by certified organizations.
Enterprise translation: Brands and businesses with ongoing translation needs will benefit from Acclaro’s enterprise translation services. You will work with a dedicated team comprised of a dedicated project manager and native-speaking professional translators who will train with your team to learn your company culture, brand and voice to create cohesion in all your translation projects.

If you think that you don’t need a translator for learning a language, you are wrong. There is no better way to learn a foreign language than to have a device repeat back to you in native tongue the exact definition of a phrase or sentence. The device is equipped with many applications, which facilitate learning. These applications talk back to you, challenge your skills, test your grammar and even check your knowledge of vocabulary. Forget about carrying useless and heavy books around with you. Next time take your electronic translator and make learning fun and enjoyable.
I’m split on the ili in two ways. I travel a lot. For the last 3+ years I’ve spent extended time in over 30 countries across 5 continents. In all that time I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve needed any translator. While Mandarin is the most-spoken first language in the world (Spanish being second), English is by far the most prevalent second language. It’s essentially the lingua franca of the world, especially in touristy places. In the times during my travels there was no common language between me and someone, a big smile and hand gestures worked wonders.
Three-step validation system: Every translation project done by Language Scientific undergoes a three-step validation system for quality assurance. Three sets of eyes look at every project: the translator, editor and proofreader. This ensures a more accurate translation, and any discrepancies between the three sets of eyes will be brought to the attention of the project manager, who will refer to the client for the final decision.
But I understand that not everyone is willing to wing it like that. Some topics aren’t as easily explained with hand gestures (how do you mime something like “hotel” or "I'm allergic to peanuts."). While I’m a strong proponent of getting a local SIM when you travel, and thereby gaining access to Google Translate wherever you are, that too is not always possible.
Website translation: A great website translation will include localization to accurately communicate your intended message. JR Language Translation Services can help you translate one page of your website or they can translate your website in its entirety. They are even able to offer multilingual Search Engine Optimization (SEO) services to help your website’s rankings.
It's important to keep in mind there’s no such thing as “real time translation” yet, despite what Google says. We’re still not quite there for the Star Trek-style Universal Translator that just speaks in your language while someone else is speaking. Right now it’s sentence (pause) by sentence (pause), give or take a few sentences. No translator is meant to tell your life story. Mostly it’s for asking for the bathroom. The ili does that, and a lot more. It's positioned as travel-centric, but I threw a lot of random phrases its way and it did pretty well. Maybe it can't translate random medical conditions, but just about anything a traveler would need should be covered. https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/traductor-a-translator-review-1072067
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